Musée du Louvre – Painted Shoes

Musée Du Louvre
Chaussures Peintes | Painted Shoes | Calzados Pintados | Gemalte Schuhe

For shoe fetishists and art lovers!
Painted shoes from the Louvre in Paris.

Margo Glantz
Catherine Belanger
Lois Lammerhuber

32 × 24.5 cm
256 pages
160 photos
German/English/French/Spanish
Hardcover bound in red faux leather
ISBN 978-3-901753-23-7
October 2011

75.00
incl. 5% vat, excl. shipping
Free shipping to Austria and Germany

SKU: 978-3-901753-23-7 Categories: , Tags: , , , ,

Authors

  • Catherine Bélanger

    Catherine Bélanger was PR lady of the Louvre from 1976 to 2007. In this capacity, she organised exhibitions, photo shootings, [...] more

  • Lois Lammerhuber

    Lois Lammerhuber is a photographer and publisher. His close collaboration with GEO Magazine started in 1984, continues to this day, [...] more

  • Margo Glantz

    Margo Glantz studied literature, dramatics and art history at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) and graduated from the Sorbonne [...] more

Awards

Details

Beheaded paintings or the secret archives of shoe design? Through the photos of acclaimed photographer Lois Lammerhuber, shod feet in the Louvre paintings reveal undreamt-of information on people. The details are not only separate works of art, but also studies on centuries of shoe fashion and an excursion into social history.

To the French writer Georges Bataille, the foot – or rather the big toe – is “the most human part of the human body”. Almost intimate, Lois Lammerhuber’s photos raise the world of feet and shoes to eye level, showing delicate shoes and stout feet; feet lacking shoes and shoes without feet; feet confined and feet embedded in shoes. A crowd of feet may express conviviality or menace. Who wore boots, and who wore sandals? Who walked on high heels, and who wore slippers? Dogs, hems of skirts, stairs, chair legs, tiles, carpets, crutches, and brooms become requisites on the stage set for the shoes. Unease, imperative behaviour and elegance reach from top to toe.

The viewing angle is a special one, not only for art enthusiasts, but also for shoe lovers. Raphael, Goya, or Ingres did not produce or design shoes. They are among the most important artists in the history of art. But they all “recorded” shoes, contributing to a history of shoes and establishing en passant archives of the shoe fashions that bore people’s appearance between 1280 and 1863.

In a brilliant discourse, Margo Glantz, art expert and author and an icon of Mexican literary studies, introduces the viewer into unexpected thoughts about painting and shoe design, about the history and sociology of shoes. The book was edited by Catherine Belanger, for many years head of the PR and marketing department of the Louvre.

Description

Beheaded paintings or the secret archives of shoe design? Through the photos of acclaimed photographer Lois Lammerhuber, shod feet in the Louvre paintings reveal undreamt-of information on people. The details are not only separate works of art, but also studies on centuries of shoe fashion and an excursion into social history.

To the French writer Georges Bataille, the foot – or rather the big toe – is “the most human part of the human body”. Almost intimate, Lois Lammerhuber’s photos raise the world of feet and shoes to eye level, showing delicate shoes and stout feet; feet lacking shoes and shoes without feet; feet confined and feet embedded in shoes. A crowd of feet may express conviviality or menace. Who wore boots, and who wore sandals? Who walked on high heels, and who wore slippers? Dogs, hems of skirts, stairs, chair legs, tiles, carpets, crutches, and brooms become requisites on the stage set for the shoes. Unease, imperative behaviour and elegance reach from top to toe.

The viewing angle is a special one, not only for art enthusiasts, but also for shoe lovers. Raphael, Goya, or Ingres did not produce or design shoes. They are among the most important artists in the history of art. But they all “recorded” shoes, contributing to a history of shoes and establishing en passant archives of the shoe fashions that bore people’s appearance between 1280 and 1863.

In a brilliant discourse, Margo Glantz, art expert and author and an icon of Mexican literary studies, introduces the viewer into unexpected thoughts about painting and shoe design, about the history and sociology of shoes. The book was edited by Catherine Belanger, for many years head of the PR and marketing department of the Louvre.

Additional information

Weight2 kg / 4.41 lbs
Book Author

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